What to Look for in Halloween Costumes

Halloween is a little over a month away, but stores have already begun selling decorations, candy, and costumes. Your child may want to dress as their favorite character, but before purchasing the costume, take some time to consider how it will affect their health and safety. Here are a few tips for what you should look for in Halloween costumes:

1. Temperature
Being at the end of October, it can get cold on Halloween, especially after the sun sets. Consider getting a larger costume that is less form-fitting to allow for extra layers to be worn underneath. If this is not possible, have them wear a jacket on top of their costume. They can still look like their favorite superhero even with a jacket on.

2. Footwear
Take note of whether the costume comes with footwear or not. Even when they do, the material may not give suitable protection from the cold ground and any debris scattered on the ground. Have your child wear appropriate shoes with their costume like their regular sneakers.

3. Visibility
A brighter costume will help your child be more visible on Halloween night as it gets dark. If the costume is not bright by design, have them carry a brightly colored or reflective candy bag/bucket. It is also a good idea to have them carry a flashlight to not only help them see but help others spot them as well. It is also a good idea to go trick-or-treating with them, especially when they are younger so that you can help them stay safe and visible from traffic.

4. Hygiene
While shopping for a costume, discourage your trick-or-treater from trying on costume helmets, hats, or masks if they are not in a sealed package. Other children may have worn those same items too and may have unknowingly spread germs and head lice.

5. Props
If a costume has a prop like a sword or a wand, always make sure your child knows that they should never swing them around or used in any other manner besides carried. Even if they are made of plastic or foam, swinging or throwing a prop can cause injury to either your child or someone else’s. Always better to be safe than sorry.